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#9900657 Aug 19, 2014 at 04:44 PM
Member
67 Posts
What do you think about characters they don't conform to the normal characteristics of their race?

For example I get the feeling the Elves are very regimented and strict, would you be ok with an open, laid back elf who doesn't care much about the vengeance the race is known for?

I'm in the process of thinking up a number of ideas for a character and I'm torn with making a social character that is open to a lot of things or whether I should go for a more hard edged character that keeps close to a cause or moral nature etc.
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#9900694 Aug 19, 2014 at 04:53 PM
Member
55 Posts
I tend to stand by the D&D perception of player characters: They are unique individuals that need not conform to the norm for whatever race is chosen.

A laid back elf is actually what seems to be hinted towards at their start. You might just be one of the extreme outliers.
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#9901180 Aug 19, 2014 at 07:07 PM
Member
307 Posts
#9900694 Varia wrote:

I tend to stand by the D&D perception of player characters: They are unique individuals that need not conform to the norm for whatever race is chosen.

A laid back elf is actually what seems to be hinted towards at their start. You might just be one of the extreme outliers.



Agree with this.. There's always exceptions that confirm the rules ;) If an entire race is war-loving ('typical orcs') there will be those that are peaceful or scholars, too :)
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#9901431 Aug 19, 2014 at 08:26 PM
Admin
1197 Posts
Agreed with the two above me. Characters like this can be made more three dimensional by having provoked some sort of negative reaction from their kin. Feeling ostracized and alienated by one's own kind can make for a fine opportunity for character building.
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#9901622 Aug 19, 2014 at 09:24 PM
Member
981 Posts
I tend to go my own way with characters, afterall we're supposed to be big damn heroes and the thing about heroes is they stand out from a crowd as a rule.


Also Tahmoh stands apart from her race by being abit.....odd is probably the kindest word to describe her as im sure yang and wanderer would agree :)
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#9905204 Aug 20, 2014 at 04:00 PM
Member
15 Posts
I too agree, do your own thing. I try to be aware of enough lore not to do something stupid, "Wait, what do you mean I can't be a vampire???" otherwise I tend to make the kind of role I want.

However, I have to disagree with the D&D comment - I've always found it to be one of the most restrictive games ever in terms of character freedom (unless you use house rules and who doesn't). That's why I tended toward skill based game systems (where I might add in my opinion Chaosium rocks tyvm).
We don't create a fantasy world to escape reality. We create it to be able to stay.
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#9905273 Aug 20, 2014 at 04:18 PM · Edited 8 years ago
Member
55 Posts
I don't want to go too far off topic, here.
The history of D&D (and by this I mean the d20 fantasy system/setting) and its rules is a long one. I've had many discussions with my group about the topic - virtues and flaws. The idea I was trying to convey is that (at least in 3rd edition) they do not say, "You're an elf? You live in the forest, commune with nature, wield swords and bows, and think the shorter-lived races are foolish." They state those features make up the typical Elf's outlook, but your character needs not conform to those ideas.
My issue with the d20 system as a whole is it is combat-focused. You level, you become more combat-effective, even if your character is not a combat character. I favor the idea of a skill-based game (currently running a CODA sci-fi game), but selling long-time d20-er's on that idea has been challenging.
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#9905377 Aug 20, 2014 at 04:41 PM
Member
31 Posts
I have to agree with a majority of the above. Being a Dungeoneer, I tend to make characters that reflect myself - be it in their professions, attitudes, or looks. In most cases, these characters do NOT conform to their racial standards. (A dwarven scholar that loves his books more than gold - An elven knight upholding honor more than racial land-rights - A human barbarian that was raised by a wandering tribe of orcs and taught how to smash things properly -- Just for a few examples)

Personally, I love making characters that break the norms for their race, because I'm not a normal person. :P It really helps me roleplay them better, and in turn, better benefits the group that I'm a part of. So long as the character falls within boundaries of the game's predetermined universe (You won't see a traditional Japanese Kitsune in a dystopian cyberpunk future set in Central America, for instance) then I'm perfectly okay with it. :D

Roll Reflex!

Formerly Known as: Buttonmasher50
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#9944528 Aug 29, 2014 at 07:47 PM
Member
18 Posts
I've always leaned away from the norm.. with one exception. Oddly enough, She's been My best RP char to date.

In EverQuest, I had a Dark elf female cleric. She was stubborn and bull-headed to the point of letting the tanks DIE to prove that they needed Her more than She needed them around. Ok so She's a -little- like Me, lol. Anyway, She abhorred males to the point of only allowing them into groups if they served a purpose She deemed important enough. ie: If there was a male and female warrior available, She'd accept the female first unless there was a prior rivalry between them. The male was allowed (yes "allowed") into the group if he could behave himself around Her, more or less.

All of My other characters have fell into almost the norms. I had a Wood Elf Warrior in EQ who insisted on pulling the mobs to the groups, while She fletched Her own arrows, running!. I had a Half Elf Mage in EQII (Nareyna, btw) who loved Alchemy.. She tended to be very cautious and measured out Her ingredients just so.. More than once in Her youth, She's burned hair or singed an eyebrow! All of My pet classes have been very kind to their pets, and took wonderful care of them. I had a Kerran (catlike humanoid) alt who cooked. Well, Nareyna "allowed" the Kerran to sleep on a straw mat in Narey's house as long as the Kerran cooked all of Narey's foods (and those of the alts, of course!).

My D&D days, I have to say.. I was pretty typical. which bored the stuffing out of Me sometimes. My Halfling Cleric was always being tossed over rocks or walls to help the larger races through the barriers because She was.. well small and She didn't argue back with the group She traveled with.

Kayanaa K'hastrator

<Black Crow Alliance>
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#9944541 Aug 29, 2014 at 07:54 PM
Member
13 Posts
I think it's difficult to give a good answer... Because yes everyone should be different, yes, you should be your own, BUT generally people are influenced greatly by their environment and who raised them. Not to say you CAN'T be different, but it can seem out of place say, if you're an Dark elf, who was raised in an harsh, dark and matriarchal society but you're a flower child for peace.

But ultimately i believe any position, if roleplayed well enough can be convincing and included in RP.
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#9944756 Aug 29, 2014 at 09:20 PM
Member
524 Posts
I don't have issue with it either. For immersion's sake I do like to see a player figure out the "why's" for the differences, so it's not so much like planting a person from the real world into this fantasy game that we're all RPing in. It can be very simple to build into their psychological profile.

For example, there's obviously some bad blood between Nuians and Elves. I can't see an older elf wanting to rub elbows with Nuians, unless there was a politically-charged motivation behind it. If they're part of a clan, maybe the reason is for their family, peace, war, spying, etc. Working with a younger elf would be more flexible, as it would make perfect sense for them to have curiosity for seeing / learning about the world around them outside of the forest - either in a rebellious way toward their elders, part of some training, maybe the elf wasn't raised by elves and was raised by Nuians instead, or even by Harani! xD

There's lots of reasons someone from a race can be outside the norm. But sometimes in RP, too many players make characters outside the norm and they just don't feel, well... outside the norm! :)

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